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Words of remembrance

School Office Manager Bob Hutton has shared his reflections about Remembrance with the school and the boys this week. Here are his words:

"I want to share with you what Remembrance means to me.

Prior to joining Eton College, I served in the Royal Navy for 22 years.  During that time I was involved in three conflicts – the Icelandic Cod War (mid 1970s); Operation Corporate (better known as the Falklands War) in 1982 and Operation Desert Storm (1st Gulf War) in the early 1990s.

I have witnessed war at first hand.  In 1982, whilst serving in HMS Antelope, during the Falklands War, we were attacked by two A4 Super Etendard Argentinian jets.  2 1000lb bombs hit the ship – one of them entering the compartment in which I was at my Action Stations.  Although neither of them exploded on entry, the damage caused was significant and it killed the young man next to me and injured the rest of us.  Later on that day one of the bombs exploded and the ship sank.  She lies as a war grave in San Carlos Bay in the Falklands Islands.

I have two requests.  Firstly, please wear a poppy.  These can be bought either in your House or from School Office.  Secondly, on Remembrance Sunday when the bell strikes 11 am, if you have no one to think of, then please remember Mark Stephens, aged 18 years old, who died in my arms on 23rd May 1982.  I remember him every day.

Thank you."

DATE POSTED: 10 November 2018

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